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Patients and families

The cancer treatments today are available because patients like you agree to participate in a clinical trial

Clinical trials are an important treatment option to consider if you or a loved one is dealing with cancer. Many of the treatments we have in Canada today are available thanks to people like you volunteering to take part in a clinical trial. Not all clinical trials are about drugs or treatments, clinical trials have helped develop screening processes and prevention methods to find better treatments that improve the lives of cancer patients.

CCTG conducts cancer clinical trials that look at the value of exercise and diet, new combinations of drugs as card card-body bg-light well as emerging therapies in precision medicine and immunotherapies.


Are you considering a cancer clinical trial as part of your treatment path?

There is a list of all of the CCTG trials that are open to patients that can be found here: CCTG Clinical Trials - Public. A complete listing of clinical trials being conducted across Canada, including the locations where they are being conducted, can be found in the searchable database located on this site: Canadian Cancer Trials.

In addition to trials being conducted by CCTG, several other clinical trials being conducted by other groups may also be available. This site has a searchable database of not only CCTG trials but any cancer clinical trial being conducted in Canada, subscribe to their trial alert to o be notified by e-mail when a new trial for a selected type of cancer or location becomes available.

Click for the .pdf:  How to Participate in a Cancer Clinical Trial (pdf)

 

 

 

Who is the Canadian Cancer Trials Group?

The Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) is a cancer research cooperative group that designs and conducts multidisciplinary clinical trials to improve the practice of medicine in preventing, detecting, and treating cancer, and to enhance the quality of life for cancer survivors. Primary support for CCTG clinical trials conducted across Canada is supported by funding provided by the Canadian Cancer Society.

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CCTG is recruiting for a Patient Representative Volunteer Role

The Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) is currently seeking applications for a Patient Representative for the Head and Neck Disease Site Committee (cancer inside the nose, throat or mouth).

This is a volunteer role for membership on the Head & Neck General Committee, the Head & Neck Executive Committee, and the CCTG Patient Representative Committee. Patient Representatives participate in all aspects of their Site Committee activities, and collectively all Site Committee Patient Representatives make up the CCTG Patient Representative Committee.

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The Impact of the COVID-19 on Canadians Living with Cancer

CCTG SC27 - The Impact of the COVID-19 on Canadians Living with Cancer

CCTG has launched a patient-centred observational study: SC27 Living With Cancer in the Time of COVID-19: A Cohort Study of the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Cancer Patients During Treatment and Survivors. The aim of this study is to examine the emotional and physical consequences of living with cancer during this pandemic and the impact it may have on your quality of life and changes in your cancer care and follow-up.

If you are an adult diagnosed with cancer within the last 10 years find out how you can participate.

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Protecting Cancer Patients from COVID-19

In the race to find new ways to prevent and treat COVID-19, CCTG has launched an innovative clinical trial focussed on strengthening the immune system for one of the most vulnerable populations – cancer patients.

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Precision medicine targeting each individuals unique form of cancer

The rise of precision medicine

Today we think about cancer in terms of the tumour site—breast, lung, colon, brain, each is separate with different treatments. Precision medicine is a new way of looking at cancer. Instead of focusing on the site of the cancer, it identifies the genetic abnormalities that make cancer possible in individual patients.  

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