Patients and families

The cancer treatments today are available because patients like you agreeing to participate in a clinical trial

Clinical trials are an important treatment option to consider if you or a loved one is dealing with cancer. Many of the treatments we have in Canada today are available thanks to people like you volunteering to take part in a clinical trial. Not all clinical trials are about drugs or treatments, clinical trials have helped develop screening processes and prevention methods to find better treatments that improve the lives of cancer patients.

CCTG conducts cancer clinical trials that look at the value of exercise and diet, new combinations of drugs as well as emerging therapies in precision medicine and immunotherapies.


Are you considering a cancer clinical trial as part of your treatment path?

There is a list of all of the CCTG trials that are open to patients that can be found here: CCTG Clinical Trials - Public. A complete listing of clinical trials being conducted across Canada, including the locations where they are being conducted, can be found in the searchable database located on this site: Canadian Cancer Trials.

In addition to trials being conducted by CCTG, several other clinical trials being conducted by other groups may also be available. This site has a searchable database of not only CCTG trials but any cancer clinical trial being conducted in Canada, subscribe to their trial alert to o be notified by e-mail when a new trial for a selected type of cancer or location becomes available.


Who is the Canadian Cancer Trials Group?

The Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) is a cancer research cooperative group that designs and conducts multidisciplinary clinical trials to improve the practice of medicine in preventing, detecting, and treating cancer, and to enhance the quality of life for cancer survivors. Primary support for CCTG comes from the Canadian Cancer Society.


Patient advocate Aldo DelCol awarded The Meritorious Service Medal

Since being diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2002, Aldo has directed his attention to building an effective national platform to address the needs of the Canadian myeloma community. As part of this work Aldo founded Myeloma Canada, the only national non-profit organization focused on the needs of the Canadian myeloma community.

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Precision medicine targeting each individuals unique form of cancer

The rise of precision medicine

Today we think about cancer in terms of the tumour site—breast, lung, colon, brain, each is separate with different treatments. Precision medicine is a new way of looking at cancer. Instead of focusing on the site of the cancer, it identifies the genetic abnormalities that make cancer possible in individual patients.  

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Canadian Cancer Trials Group investigator Janet Dancey, Chris O'Callaghan, Wendy Parulekar

Putting patients first

For the scientists at CCTG, their inspiration comes from the people their questions are designed to help: patients living with cancer.

“These people are at their most vulnerable,” says Dr. Dancey. “When they enroll in a trial, they do it because they hope to get the best treatment. But they also do it to help answer an important question, if not for themselves, then for everyone who follows them. For me, these people are heroes. In the face of adversity, they act for the greater good.”

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Asking the right questions

Once the initial shock of a cancer diagnosis wears off, patients and families are left with questions. Lots and lots of questions. It might come as a relief to know that some of the most brilliant, accomplished scientists from around the world are listening.  

“The biggest question we ask is the one that all cancer patients have,” says CCTG Scientific Director Dr. Janet Dancey. “What is the best treatment?”

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