Canadian Cancer Trials Group Bulletins

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CCS Listing of Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2011

The results of THREE Canadian Cancer Trials Group-led clinical trials were included in the Canadian Cancer Society's listing of the top 10 breakthroughs of 2011.

The noteworthy trials include:

Canadian Cancer Trials Group MAP.3 -- A Phase III Randomized Study of Exemestane versus Placebo in Postmenopausal Women at Increased Risk of Developing Breast Cancer

"The drug exemestane significantly reduces risk of breast cancer in landmark trial"
A large international clinical trial investigating a new way to prevent breast cancer in women at increased risk of developing the disease found that the drug exemestane reduces this risk by 65 per cent compared with placebo. The trial was led by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, which is funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. This discovery was recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology as one of the world's most important cancer treatment breakthroughs in 2011.

Canadian Cancer Trials Group MA.20 -- A Phase III Study of Regional Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer

"Practice-changing trial shows additional radiation decreases cancer recurrence"
A Canadian-led clinical trial has found that additional radiation treatment improves disease-free survival in women with early breast cancer and reduces the risk of cancer recurrence -- a finding that could change the standard treatment for these women. Interim analysis of the results showed a greater than 30 per cent improvement in disease-free survival for those receiving additional radiation therapy. The trial was led by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, which is funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. This discovery was recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology as one of the world's most important cancer treatment breakthroughs in 2011.

Canadian Cancer Trials Group PR.7 -- A Phase III Randomized Trial Comparing Intermittent versus Continuous Androgen Suppression for Patients with Prostate-Specific-Antigen Progression in the Clinical Absence of Distant Metastases Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

"Drug 'holiday' will change standard of care for men with recurring prostate cancer"
A trial led by the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, which is funded by the Canadian Cancer Society, found that men with prostate cancer who are treated with intermittent courses of androgen-suppressing (hormone) therapy live as long as those receiving continuous therapy. The results are expected to change current treatment protocols and reduce some of the side effects of hormone therapy, including impotence. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) where the research was selected as the "Best of ASCO".

For a complete listing of CCS's Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2011, please see this link ... http://files.newswire.ca/1012/top10breakthroughs.pdf.