Canadian Cancer Trials Group Bulletins

General


Recent Publications

IND.170
Thiessen, B. et al., 2009, A phase I/II trial of GW572016 (lapatinib) in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: clinical outcomes, pharmacokinetics and molecular correlation: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology. Published Online June 5, 2009

IND.170 is a phase I/II trial of GW572016 (lapatinib) in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Results of this study suggest that lapatinib apparent oral clearance increased by approximately tenfold when given with EIAEDs. In this small sample, EGFRvIII expression and PTEN loss did not predict a favorable subtype. Overall, lapatinib did not show significant activity in GBM patients.

To view the complete article, please use this link ... http://www.springerlink.com/content/x107141kln0h3ll1/?p=292f95e28d8f40fea0e28cfacd19263d&pi=1.

MA.12
Bramwell, V. H. C. et al., 2009, A randomized placebo-controlled study of tamoxifen after adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal women with early breast cancer (National Cancer Institute of Canada-Clinical Trials Group Trial, MA.12): Annals of Oncology. Published Online July 23, 2009

MA.12 is a randomized placebo-controlled study of tamoxifen after adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal women with early breast cancer (EBC). Results from this trial indicate that adjuvant tamoxifen, given after chemotherapy to premenopausal women with EBC, improved 5-year disease-free survival. However, poor compliance may have reduced treatment efficacy.

To view the complete article, please use this link ... http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/mdp326?ijkey=iDQvei8ua7jfkBm&keytype=ref.

Presentation of Nonfinal Results of Randomized Controlled Trials at Major Oncology Meetings

Booth, C. M., A. Le Maître, K. Ding, K. Farn, M. Fralick, C. Phillips, D. W. Cescon, and R. M. Meyer, 2009, Presentation of Nonfinal Results of Randomized Controlled Trials at Major Oncology Meetings: Journal of Clinical Oncology. Published Online July 20, 2009.

Booth et al. designed this study to compare randomized controlled trial (RCT) abstract and article publications to evaluate the potential implications of abstract publications of efficacy that are based on nonfinal analyses (NFAs). They found that the majority of RCT abstracts presented at major oncology conferences include important data discrepancies compared with their subsequent published articles, suggesting that reporting of nonfinal analyses is common. Given the potential for NFA to be misleading and to introduce bias to trial conduct, the authors conclude that clinicians, investigators, and conference organizers should be cautious when interpreting results of RCTs in abstract format.

To view the complete article, please use this link ... http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/reprint/JCO.2008.18.8771v1.

The NCI Bulletin is also highlighting this study in its recent edition. The complete item can be found at http://www.cancer.gov/ncicancerbulletin/072809/page3#d.